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Next Cycle of weeks


(1) Next Cycle of weeks

Posted by : Lewis on 27/08/2012 09:46:26

Antonio - sorry, Edwyn's decided to jump ship to Ant's 3.5 game. I feel I should stay with him, so that's me out too. Apologies, and this is no reflection on the quality of the game, which I was enjoying very much (even if I did get disolved by a Dragon!).


(2) Re: Next Cycle of weeks

Posted by : Mark on 28/08/2012 13:41:45

Antonio, I checked the games list on Sunday and there's every possibility that we'll be more than 2 players down.

There seem to be a couple of exisiting campaigns running in the next set that quite a few of the DL players have characters in.

I think Jez said he's in 3 campaigns that'll be running in the next set and Josh and Colin both have characters also in other campaigns.

Whether or not they continue in these campaigns or DL i'm not sure but we could be in a situation where it's just Sturm and Carramon, who although are awesome may struggle a little on their own.

In which case I suggest we pick a different date when more players are available.


(3) Re: Next Cycle of weeks

Posted by : rabindranath72 on 28/08/2012 14:02:56

Hi,

thanks for the heads up. I am sorry to hear Edwyn doesn't want to go on with the Dragonlance game; I realise it wasn't very kid's friendly.

If we are down more than two players it could be problematic. Going down to only two...it probably wouldn't be feasible at all, at least if we want to keep the current stable of characters.

I am not sure I can make it to the club next Sunday; if I won't be there, could one of you poll the others w.r.t their intention? I might propose something else for other players.

Thanks,
Antonio


(4) Re: Next Cycle of weeks

Posted by : Mark on 03/09/2012 09:29:31

Hi Antonio,

I asked around last night and Colin is in another game with his young lad So DL would be 3 down.

Not wanting to be without a game and figuring the DL players are dropping like flies I quickly put my name down for WFRP. Which luckily is a game I've wanted to try for awhile. Jez who already has a character in the WFRP campaign has also put his name on the list.

That leaves Josh and Stephen, neither of which gave any indication of what they are planning to do.

There's a few other players not yet signed up for a game so there's likely to be players free if you fancy running something different, or even if you want to play, I believe there's likely to be 2 new attendee's who both GM.

As Lewis said this is in no reflection of your game, which I really enjoyed. Sorry if this causes you any inconvenience, hopefully we'll be able to pick up DL in the near future.


(5) Re: Next Cycle of weeks

Posted by : rabindranath72 on 03/09/2012 11:32:51

Hi Mark,

first of all, thank you for the time and effort to ask around; it's much appreciated. Also thank you for the kind words. It's not much of an incovenience, though I admit I didn't expect such a drop out; I suppose that's the nature of club gaming. I hope there will be enough interest to pick up the campaign at a later date.

Funny you mention WFRP, it was one of the options I was thinking about as a replacement for the Dragonlance game


(6) Re: Next Cycle of weeks

Posted by : ColinBuckler on 04/09/2012 09:13:26

Hi Antonio,

Sorry I haven't had chance to reply - been on holiday and had limited internet access.

Firstly, I have been reallty enjoying Dragonlance and do wish to continue playing in - like everybody else in the game, though I suspect there is not enough combat for Ed. Since you were last at the club my youngest has started playing (Matt is 9) along side both myself and my other son (Sam is 11), so I need to guide him otherwise he will become bored, restless and cause mayham in any game he is in. Due to this fact I will need to drop out or include him in Dragonlance - though there may not be enough combat to interest him as its mainly character interactive.

The other problem being is other games clashing at the club - I know for one that Jeremy is in potntially several games at the same time. Games do get played - probably the best example of this is Blacksands 1 run by Tiddy - we seem to get a session in about once a year (mainly due to most ofthe popular GM's being in the game), so we should look at rescheduling the game again maybe giving a bit more notice as I know peopel are already talking about the next gaming session after the one starting in a couple of weeks.


(7) Re: Next Cycle of weeks

Posted by : rabindranath72 on 04/09/2012 13:25:34

Hi Colin,

thanks for the comments.

There is no problem including your sons in the Dragonlance game; if they want more combat, it can be (subtly) accommodated (same goes for Edwyn)

Also, if they want to create new PCs from scratch, that's OK too (same for the existing players if they want to change characters; for example if Edwyn would be happier playing something else, that can be definitely accommodated.)

I can give my availability to DM Dragonlance from the next-next game slot, but is there a way to track these advance plans?

Cheers,
Antonio


(8) Re: Next Cycle of weeks

Posted by : Anonymous on 04/09/2012 17:06:30

I believe Colin updates the forums every break week (Or just before) to reflect the upcoming games in the next block - however i'm sure you wishing to run Dragonlance in the set after this new one coming up, can be noted and booked in advance and we just need to make sure people are aware of it before they sign up for other things.

The main problem as stated somewhere else i've read on the forums today, is that there are now so many ongoing campaigns, that some of the pre-existing campaigns are only being played perhaps once a year.

I know my campaign other long working campaign, originally started out at the club, but has ended up having to move to a night at someone's house for all the players involved, so that we can get to play it as there is just never chance to fit it in at the club anymore AND it has been going for so long, fitting new players into it is difficult because of how much history is involved with it.

In that campaign though, i've had Colin and Jerry as consistant players from the very start, but many players have been hopping in and out along the way and i think this is just the way of club gaming - you end up having to work around it.

My new campaign, i want to be able to run it on a semi-regular basis, but i'm also aware im likely to get players dropping in and out (though i'd like to try and avoid that wherever possible), so the chances are i'll perhaps get to run it once every 3 sets of game cycles (And even then i'll be lucky to fit in.)



Mass Battles?


(1) Mass Battles?

Posted by : rabindranath72 on 10/08/2012 10:42:10

Dear all,

during the last session the PCs were involved in a mass battle, which was handled in an improvised way (with the help of Jerry to assess expectations of dice rolls.) It went fairly well, but considering that depending on what you do, the PCs might get involved into other mass battles, I was thinking that a more "formal" way to run mass battles might be interesting. I wouldn't go to the level of a "proper" war game like Warhammer, since it would detract from the role playing aspect too much and would require too many resources in terms of minis, terrain etc. But something simpler along the lines of the War Machine rules (in the old D&D Companion set) or the Dragons of Glory Dragonlance supplement (a very streamlined war game) or even the Birthright War Cards system might fit the bill.

So, what do you think? Would you be interested in adding war gaming elements to the campaign?

Cheers,
Antonio


(2) Re: Mass Battles?

Posted by : ColinBuckler on 11/08/2012 20:10:39

I'm up for it - as long as the rules are simple and easy to follow.


(3) Mass Battles / Mighty Empires

Posted by : ColinBuckler on 13/08/2012 12:04:11

Another good option would be Warhammer Mighty Empires.

What it does is works out a banner which consists of several units based on a points value. After taking in some easy to calculate values it comes down to a simple dice roll to work out who won and how many points of damage were to units/banners. If also covers some basic rules if a character was in that unit/banner and what happens to them.

I have a copy of the rules at home - somewhere....

More information can be found at:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mighty_Empire


(4) Re: Mass Battles?

Posted by : rabindranath72 on 13/08/2012 16:08:45

Thanks for the link! I never heard of that game, so I am not sure how easy it would be to adapt to AD&D.

The D&D War Machine rules in the Companion Set are quite similar to Mighty Empires from what I read, in that they are more strategical than tactical. One needs to calculate the Battle Rating of the troops, then after assessing the battlefield conditions and tactics/strategy, combat resolution happens with one die roll per combat turn. There is little to no actual movement of troops. There is a separate set of rules to handle sieges and war machines if one wants more detail (it's in the Master Set.)

Birthright's War Cards system has a system of tactical positioning based on front ranks, rear ranks etc. It plays quite fast, but War Cards need to be tailored to the armies in play. I have a Dragon Annual article which describes conversion from Battlesystem 2e to War Cards, so this might make things easy.

The Dragons of Glory rules have a bit of both strategy and tactics, in very light doses. It uses an hex grid, and combat is resolved with one dice roll. It comes pre-packaged with unit stats, and since it's built with Dragonlance in mind, each nation depicted in the game already has the relevant army rosters.

In terms of abstraction, I would rank the systems as follows (lowest to highest): War Cards, Dragons of Glory, War Machine.

In terms of complexity, (lowest to highest): Dragons of Glory, War Cards, War Machine. Though "complex" is a really relative term here; if compared with "true" war games, all of them would be newbie-level stuff


(5) Re: Mass Battles?

Posted by : Walrus on 15/08/2012 09:15:58

Have another possibility to add to the above comments. I am currently GMing Pendragon and am using the Book of Batttles system. This splits the battle into roughly 1 hour turns and allows a single battle encounter each turn. The characters then have a single round to do what they can and depending on their success they affect the overall battle slightly. There is some number crunching and a bit of basic maths involved, but this allows a sort of grand scale look at what is happening and also a zoom in to the actions of our heros, without going into mass round by round actions.

It would need some conversion and probably a bit of a rethink as to how to utilise certain skill rolls, but I like it and the players seem to get a bit of a buzz out of the combat and having an effect on the whole battle.
Jez


(6) Re: Mass Battles?

Posted by : ColinBuckler on 15/08/2012 21:54:09

Going back to Mighty Empires - the easiest way to work this in is based on points in a banner. You could assume XP points = Banner points. You may wish to factor the XP down by 10 (i.e. divide by XP/10).

The combat rules are on page 26 of the following attachment (on GW web site so is free to download):

http://www.games-workshop.com/MEDIA_CustomProductCatalog/m470850_Mighty_Empires_Original_Rules_1990.pdf

It covers such things as what hex your in, if the attack is a flank, surprise in involved all equating to a combat roll depending upon banner attacking strength compared to opposing banner defense. The result would be base upon XP loss and that could equate to casualties i.e. XP loss in troops. There are also rules covering what happens to a main character - though yet again very simplistic.

Other interesting factors include maintaining the baggage for the banner (i.e. food supplies/re-equipment ...etc). It also factors in things for sieges/tactics, razing of ground.

Pretty good on the whole - but the fight comes down to a very simplistic roll - which does work. I ran a campaign which ran based on these rules for almost 2 years and they do work!

Using these rules you could process a turn in less than 10 mins.

At the minimum they are worth a read....


(7) Re: Mass Battles?

Posted by : rabindranath72 on 16/08/2012 13:30:57

ColinBuckler: Going back to Mighty Empires - the easiest way to work this in is based on points in a banner. You could assume XP points = Banner points. You may wish to factor the XP down by 10 (i.e. divide by XP/10).

The combat rules are on page 26 of the following attachment (on GW web site so is free to download):

http://www.games-workshop.com/MEDIA_CustomProductCatalog/m470850_Mighty_Empires_Original_Rules_1990.pdf

It covers such things as what hex your in, if the attack is a flank, surprise in involved all equating to a combat roll depending upon banner attacking strength compared to opposing banner defense. The result would be base upon XP loss and that could equate to casualties i.e. XP loss in troops. There are also rules covering what happens to a main character - though yet again very simplistic.

Other interesting factors include maintaining the baggage for the banner (i.e. food supplies/re-equipment ...etc). It also factors in things for sieges/tactics, razing of ground.

Pretty good on the whole - but the fight comes down to a very simplistic roll - which does work. I ran a campaign which ran based on these rules for almost 2 years and they do work!

Using these rules you could process a turn in less than 10 mins.

At the minimum they are worth a read....[/quote:1xsiow0g]

Thanks Colin. I will definitely have a look! If all it's needed is XPs/Banner Points it should be relatively easy to adapt. I skimmed page 26 and it looks eerily similar to D&D's War Machine rules...


(8) Re: Mass Battles?

Posted by : rabindranath72 on 16/08/2012 13:31:41

Walrus: Have another possibility to add to the above comments. I am currently GMing Pendragon and am using the Book of Batttles system. This splits the battle into roughly 1 hour turns and allows a single battle encounter each turn. The characters then have a single round to do what they can and depending on their success they affect the overall battle slightly. There is some number crunching and a bit of basic maths involved, but this allows a sort of grand scale look at what is happening and also a zoom in to the actions of our heros, without going into mass round by round actions.

It would need some conversion and probably a bit of a rethink as to how to utilise certain skill rolls, but I like it and the players seem to get a bit of a buzz out of the combat and having an effect on the whole battle.

Jez:
I have Pendragon 4th edition, is that the same system?


(9) Re: Mass Battles?

Posted by : Lewis on 18/08/2012 00:12:09

Honestly, not too keen on having many massed battles as a regular thing. However, given the nature of the campaign, I can see that it would be more satisfying if the inevitable large scale battles didn't just happen "off screen" and the players had some way to influence what happens. Obviously I'd be VERY keen for the roleplaying or adventuring that the players/PCs had done leading up to the battle to have significantly effected the starting conditions appropriately. Other than that, I think the simpler the rules are, the better.


(10) Re: Mass Battles?

Posted by : Walrus on 18/08/2012 13:24:40

Hi Antonio it is actually from Greg Stafford's Book of Battle primarily designed for use with the 5th Edition but easily used with others.


(11) Re: Mass Battles?

Posted by : Mark on 18/08/2012 17:17:43

Lewis: Obviously I'd be VERY keen for the roleplaying or adventuring that the players/PCs had done leading up to the battle to have significantly effected the starting conditions appropriately.

Oh it did!
Not sure if anyone has kept you up to speed with the last session so here's a little of what happened.

We made it to the Elven city and told them what had been going on, they were a bit funny with us but fortunately Tanis kept his cool and didn't threaten to burn everyone and everything.

They reluctantly agreed to help us free the prisoners from the wagon train and thanks to the sneaky spying abilities of the Kender we knew all about their forces disposition.
So at dawn we led two detachments of Elven archers (only about 24 in total, I had asked for 200 but Elves are a bit stingy) through the woods to set our ambush.
Tanis and Sturm got their military minds together, drew maps in the dirt and wrote notes on the back of fag packets and came up with a plan of attack relying on surprise, distraction and most importantly the horrendous amount of firepower an Elven archer can bring to bare during a surprise round.

Once the Dragonmen in the vanguard had passed we launched our attack, Tass rushed the wagons to free the prisoners, some of us went left, some of us went right and in all the confusion we managed to pull it off.

We even had a rallying point of the tree line where the archers could give us covering fire as we fell back. It didn't all go to plan, the Fuemaster? brewmaster? whatever he's called managed to escape but not until we'd gave him a bloody nose and some serious burns.

All in all it was really good fun and the preparation prior to battle was equally entertaining. We made good use of the intel Tass had brought back, such as what forces they had, marching order and contents of the wagons. We focused on the enemies we could handle (squishy hobgoblins) and attacked when they were at their most vulnerable. I think you'd have really enjoyed it.


(12) Re: Mass Battles?

Posted by : rabindranath72 on 19/08/2012 10:55:02

Mark,

thank you for the session recap (and backstage commentary )
(Just a note: the nasty hob's name is Toede; Fewmaster being a sort of rank name in the dragon armies.)

It seems the general consensus is to have a simple enough system which allows the individual PCs some latitude in action, and in which the PCs can directly affect the battle both before and during the action (in particular since you have a few spellcasters in the group.) I gave a read to Colin's suggested Mighty Empires, and while definitely easy, the conversion to/from D&D does not look easy. The main problem is the conversion of individual figures like the PCs/main NPCs and single monsters like Dragons (which in Mighty Empires are way too powerful and handled more like a catastrophic event.) With these desiderata, probably a mix of Battlesystem 2e (for small units action) and Birthright's War Cards system (for company-level action) would work best, possibly with some elements of Mighty Empires. I will try to abstract a rules document and post it.

Cheers,
Antonio


(13) Re: Mass Battles?

Posted by : Lewis on 19/08/2012 14:26:46

I have a boxed set of the AD&DE Battle System, if that's any help.


(14) Re: Mass Battles?</ br>Posted by : rabindranath72 on 19/08/2012 19:37:13

Lewis: I have a boxed set of the AD&DE Battle System, if that's any help.

Thanks Lewis, I too have it, but it's too fiddly for what we want to do. The 2e version is definitely lighter both in terms of unit stats and rules.



Sorry - can't make 22/07


(1) Sorry - can't make 22/07

Posted by : Lewis on 22/07/2012 08:51:01

Many apologies, especially to Antonio, but I can't make it tonight, so you'll have to manage without Flint & Tanis! A combination of factors means I'll be too knackered to drive safely.

I'll be back on 05 August to restart The Chronicles of Corwin. Currently converting the data dump of my old posts to try and get the last few episodes of the party diary up on here.

Have fun tonight.



On the Elven Nations of Krynn


(1) On the Elven Nations of Krynn

Posted by : rabindranath72 on 14/07/2012 11:27:29

Long ago, in the near forgotten Age of Dreams, Kith-Kanan led the elves to Qualinesti. The Second Dragon War of Silvanesti had brought these western elves great fame back in their ancient home. But Silvanos, King of the Silvanesti, felt uneasy at the rise to power of the Qualinesti elves.

Yet when the Kinslayer war with the human kingdom of Ergoth erupted, the king did not hesitate to call upon the Qualinesti. The war was long and bloody, leaving scars that no treaty could heal. Thus, when borders were agreed upon and the bloodshed halted, the elves of the west felt removed from their kin, and wanted no part of the ancient home of Silvanesti.

With the scribing of the Swordsheath scroll, many problems of the world were laid to rest. The King of Ergoth gave the western elves a wooded place of great beauty and natural harmony-the
land that has come to be known as Qualinesti.

Sad was Silvanos the king, when his eldest son Kith-Kanan chose to lead the western elves to their new home. Deep was the split between the two elven kingdoms. Silvanesti continued to follow the lofty ancient ways, removed from the other peoples of Krynn, while Kith-Kanan and the Qualinesti made peace, traded, and intermarried with their neighbors.



Chronicles


(1) Chronicles

Posted by : rabindranath72 on 14/07/2012 11:24:08

. . . from the Iconochronos of Astinus of Palanthas, Lorekeeper of Krynn, in the 351st  year after the Cataclysm.

. . . Darkness has fallen over this world, poor, suffering Krynn. Thus it has been since the great Cataclysm, when the old world fell. Curse the King Priest of Istar, whose pride caused him to give orders to the True Gods, rather than to ask humbly for their aid. For the Gods punished Krynn for this blasphemy, and much was forever lost. Lost were the great cities, the accumulated wisdom and knowledge of many generations. Lost as well was all knowledge of the True Gods, and mankind sank into idolatry. Clerics lost their power, and mankind lost hope for its salvation. But hope always springs from the most modest of causes, and so it was that the Innfellows began the salvation of Krynn. Originally there were seven: Tanis, Kitiara, Flint, Tasslehoff, Raistlin, Caramon, and Sturm. Five years ago they set out from the Inn of the Last Home, seeking knowledge of the True Gods. In five years they found nothing, and so all returned to the sleepy town of Solace, the tree-city built in a Vallenwood grove. All returned save one: Kitiara the beautiful, whose whereabouts are yet unknown. Tanis was the leader, a half-elf born of an elf mother who was taken by a human turned savage in the terrible times that followed the Cataclysm. The elves took him in, and he was raised in Qualinesti, elf home. But he is ever torn between his human and elf halves, and has found the wanderlust strong within him. Caramon and Raistlin are twins—yet unlike as night and day. Caramon is bright,
Raistlin is dark. Caramon is a fighter of great strength and courage; Raistlin is a sorcerer gone cynical, a doubter. They have survived great and terrible trials. The tests that Raistlin underwent to become a sorcerer left him with skin the color of worthless gold and pupils the shape of hourglasses. Sturm Brightblade was the son of a Knight of Solamnia raised in secrecy. Now taking up the mantle of his father, his most puissant knightly aim is to die nobly in a battle
against his enemies. He is a man of military bearing, of great dignity, and of power—a true knight. Flint Fireforge is a fighter of the Hill Dwarf race, distrustful of all—including other dwarven races (especially the cursed Aghar, the Gully Dwarves). Now of grandfatherly age, he is but two dwarven generations removed from the great Cataclysm itself! His family was killed through the neglect of the Mountain Dwarves, and now he seeks to avenge his people.
Tasslehoff Burrfoot is a Handler (I would say thief) of the Kender people, a halfling in size but a giant in curiosity. He is a treasure of odd information, of useful insights, and of clever solutions to knotty problems. These were the original Innfellows, but the puzzle was not yet complete. For, on the day of their return to Solace, they met Goldmoon, a princess of the Que-Shu tribe, and her lover Riverwind, a Ranger of great strength and few words. Riverwind, a poor man’s son, had quested far to prove the worth of his love to Goldmoon’s father. After many trials, he obtained the Blue Crystal Staff that belonged to the Goddess Mishakal. His tribe nearly stoned him to death, not recognizing the power of the staff, but when Goldmoon came to die with him, the staff transported them away. In Solace the Innfellows met Can, a man from far Ergoth, a traveller and poet, he too searching for the True Gods. Fate was at work. The True Gods, working through subtlety, as is their wont, had begun the redemption of Krynn. Yet good cannot triumph over evil before evil has had its day. From the north, the dragonarmies
marched, laying waste to the land and enslaving the people.

The Heroes learned of Xak Tsaroth, an ancient city fallen to evil. Now occupied by dragonmen, a mysterious, evil race, Xak Tsaroth proved to be the home of the darkest of evil: Onyx, a Black Dragon. Ah, you say. A Dragon. A creature of myth. The great serpents are only tales with which to frighten young children, you think. Yet though dragons have not entered Krynn in over one thousand years, they have returned. How have the serpents returned to Krynn? How can mere man stand against an army of dragons? But the power of the True Gods shone forth. The  Crystal Staff was blessed by the Goddess Mishakal, whose great power is that of Healing. The Heroes destroyed the dragon Onyx, and so were discovered the Disks of the Gods, which brought knowledge of the True Gods back to Krynn. Where will the Heroes, armed with scant
knowledge, go from here?



Races of Ansalon


(1) Races of Ansalon

Posted by : rabindranath72 on 12/07/2012 11:12:17

Civilized Humans

Civilized humans make up the largest racial group on Ansalon. They can be found  almost everywhere, whether they truly belong there or not. This widespread  population  also makes for great diversity in culture and attitude. Civilized humans cannot truly be defined as a unified group because each country, city, or town has it’s own appearance and personality. Being so prolific and successful, nations of civilized
humans often come into conflict with each other and other races. However, despite these conflicts, many humans have worked hard to live peacefully with the other  races—even as other humans have worked to subjugate or war with them.
[Game note: they can choose any class except Barbarian]

Nomadic Humans

For hundreds of years before the first permanent dwellings were erected and their ancestors decided to stay in one place, humans roamed the length and breadth of Ansalon. These nomads lived off the land, existing in harmony with nature. Today these people are thought of as primitive, barbarian, and savage. However, regardless of how others think of them, nomads take fierce pride in the ability of their people to exist, and even thrive, in lands others shun as inhospitable. Mountains, forests, plains, tundra, and deserts are places nomads have conquered and still call home today. Though every tribe differs, most nomads harbor a deeply ingrained distrust of other races, including city dwelling humans and other nomads. Even in the best of times, relations between nomadic tribes and outsiders are strained. However, despite their generalizations of other races, nomads tend to give individual members a chance to prove themselves worthy of respect. Once respect is won, outsiders usually discover that no one is a more steadfast ally than a nomad. [Game note: they can choose any class except Cavalier]

Dwarves, Hill

To the other races of Ansalon, when referring to a dwarf, the dwarf in question is mostly likely of the Neidar clan. The term Neidar was first coined in Thorbardin to describe a clan of dwarves who dwelt above ground. Since that time, the term has been used to refer to nearly all dwarves who prefer to live on the surface of Krynn rather than beneath it. They are the most well known of all dwarves, because they interact with the outside world more than their mountain dwelling brethren. Known to most races simply as hill dwarves, the Neidar are sturdy fighters, shrewd
merchants, and master craftsmen. More curious about the world around them than their
mountain-dwelling cousins, hill dwarves have traveled far and wide, spreading their culture and plying their trade in every nation of Ansalon. Nearly every mountain in Ansalon has a settlement of hill dwarves somewhere along its base. Dwarven adventurers will most often be Neidar, as they are usually the only dwarves willing to leave their homes in search of greater fortune. In their dealings, Neidar tend to be fair and honest, but will haggle for every last copper. Hill dwarves are loyal friends if one can penetrate their grumbling manners and gruff
exterior. [Game note: PHB dwarves]

Elves

Throughout the population of Ansalonian elves, there is considerable variation in culture, politics, language, and physical characteristics. However, the commonalities of the different elven nations are even greater. Well aware of their race’s achievements and place in history, elves tend to be proud to a fault, looking down in disdain, pity, or both at the shorter-lived and backward races. This led to policies of isolationism and racial supremacy in the elven nations of old. This superiority complex is deeply ingrained and difficult to overcome, even for elves who spend a great deal of time among the other races of Ansalon. No matter their nation of origin, elves share an affinity for the natural world. Whether encouraging it to do their bidding, working together with it as a partner, or embracing it in its wild and untamed state, elves appear to have a bond with Krynn’s wild places.

Qualinesti, High Elves

The Qualinesti represent the progressive side of elvendom and are more willing to engage the wider world than other elven nations. [Game note: PHB elves]

Half-Elves

Interactions between elves and humans have rarely been happy. From the earliest days after humans and elves awoke on Ansalon, long before the time of Silvanos, humans and elves have clashed. Tragically, these conflicts have sometimes involved the horrific crime of rape; it is used as a weapon to demoralize and demean the enemy populace, other times soldiers having their way with the locals is simply seen as part of the spoils of victory. In either case, in some occasions, a child is born some months later. In these violent cases, the mother is most often, but not always, the elven half of the child’s parentage. Rarer, but not unprecedented, is the union of elf and human based on love rather than force. The elves have strong taboos against mixing bloodlines, and most human communities aren’t much more tolerant; thus, many such
relationships are kept secret even if the relationship is a committed marriage rather than a brief affair. [Game note: PHB half-elves]

Gnomes, Mad (“Thinkers”)

In every society, there are individuals who operate outside of the accepted norm. This is no different for the gnomish race. In gnomish society, these individuals are known as mad gnomes. They are gnomes who repeatedly break or no longer conform to the acceptable customs of society. There are a number of different ways a gnome might become branded a mad gnome. The gnome may continually break the laws of their Guild, sabotage another gnome’s Life Quest, persistently display thought processes that do not resonate with gnomish culture (such as
believing in Cause and Effect), always creating devices that work and are considered complete, or even displaying no inclination for tinkering or science. In all cases, the gnome is considered damaged in some way. [Game note: PHB gnomes; they can also access the gnomish invention rules from the Dragonlance Adventures sourcebook]

Kender

Kender are the children of Krynn. They are an adventure-loving, curious, spontaneous race that embodies the youthfulness and lust for life many adventurers share. Almost every kender encountered is in the thrall of wanderlust, an affliction striking kender hard during their late teen and early adult years. Wanderlust causes kender to pick-up and travel the world far and wide in search of one exciting adventure after another. A kender’s curiosity and fearlessness take them to places no sane being would think to go. This includes pockets, private homes, and locked chests. However, the majority of kender are appalled at the thought of stealing. Most true kender do not steal; they handle. Handling is simply the act of picking up an item and examining it out of curiosity. They are often so involved with examining the item that they wander away and forget to return it. To a kender, this makes perfect sense, but to other races, it’s just another word for stealing. [Game note: PHB halflings with the additional abilities of Taunt and Fearlessness]